Skip to main content

About your Search

20120926
20121004
STATION
CNN 5
CNNW 5
CSPAN 1
KQED (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
. really from 1858 until 1960, john f. kennedy versus richard nixon, debates didn't play that big a role in presidential campaigns. there were no presidential debates. but you did have in primaries occasionally, squareoffs going on. interesting to even think about stats from minnesota rarely run for president -- stacken ran for president every four years. kennedy/nixon was the game changer in debate history. people that listened to it thought nixon won on radio but on television, john f. kennedy won. nobody was that happy with the debates. we had no debates in '64 '68 '72. came back in 1976 when jimmy carter ended up doing well because of gerald ford's famous gaffe. that's the big question. can you become gaffe-free? everybody is going to be looking wednesday night to see if there was a mistake made by either person. it puts a lot of pressure on the candidates. >> jennifer: you mention nixon and kennedy and those who saw the debate felt like kennedy won. what do you think is more important? what the candida
was in black and white in 1960. it was argued that john f. kennedy had shown richard nixon mainly because of the way he looked on screen. do these debates boil down to style over substance? we're joined by brian callahan who coaches government and industry leaders in public speaking. how much do looks matter in this? if nixon had sweated less in that clip that we just saw, would he have done better? >> i think he would have. particularly since it was the dawn of television and people were getting visual cues for the first time. when senator kennedy looked much more comfortable than nixon, that played very much to his advantage. >> well, let's take a look at the presidential debate now in 1984. ronald reagan was asked if he was too old to be president. >> i want you to know that i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i'm not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. [laughter] >> that is also one of my favorite lines. >> that is my favorite as well. >> it is pretty good. it tells us nothing about policy but it made us laugh. >> it tells us that h
. >> john f. kennedy, a young senator from massachusetts, facing off against vice president richard nixon, who is known to be a fierce debater. but on screen, kennedy looks cool and calm, while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. nixon flounders under the glare of television for all four debates. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in his debate with georgia govern oor jimmy carter. >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry, could i just -- >> the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and is blamed by many for costing ford the election. in 1980, ronald reagan is repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> but reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> four years later, president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age duri
, are we going to hold him accountable in the same way we have others? it caused nixon his job. it almost cost clinton the white house. are we going to re-elect a budget who was not honest with us? this is not just a mistake or that they did not have the information. we are getting evidence that they did know and they still continued the story about the film being the basis of the situation. that is a dangerous place for every american to be when we cannot trust our own government. >>neil: we will get a different reason from a democratic strategist who know as lot about how this sorts out in that sense. joe, to the gore's point that this could be a festering crisis, how the administration responded to this crisis and how forthcoming it was. what did you think? >>guest: well, it is way too early to throw around words like "why" and "coverup." the fact that john kerry, a democrat, is asking for answers, there will be a bipartisan look at exactly what happened here. for five days --. >>neil: what do you make of the fact that john kerry, a guy who could be a front runner for the secretary of
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
. >> richard nixon probably ruined the taping thing for a lot of people. >> he did. >> it was a fantastic collection -- a fantastic archive, it comes with its own audio cd which is great so that you can listen to this stuff over and over again. i can't underscore how fascinating this is moments in history. congratulations on that. >> thank you so much. >> thanks for joining us. the book is "listening in the secret white house recordings of jfk. "coming up, all in, akin lightning rod missouri congressman todd akin isn't backing away from his challenge to senator claire mcskas kill and some key republicans are getting back on the akin bandwagon. chris christie is not one of them. >> over the course of the week we're seeing more prominent republicans senator demint, tom coburn, lindsey graham coming out in support of todd akin. do you think he should have the support of the republican party? >> into no. >> in. >> >>. >> no. >> no, i don't. >> the fallout from the latest akin push next in what now. [ female announcer ] need help keeping your digestive balance? try the #1 gastroenterologist re
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)